Mental Rest

Happy Sabbath.

Every now and again, I come to a point where I’m begging Sabbath to come around. This has been a very trying week: I’m not entirely happy with the degree I’ve ended up with at university (yes, take note: ended up with), so this has meant that I’m very behind with my work. Very behind. I’m due to hand in a portfolio of French work next week and I wasn’t even aware of such a task existing, so this means that this coming week will be a rush and scramble to get the work done. I have two assignments to do for November that I haven’t started and I’ve not been able to buy a single textbook for my degree. This has led to a feeling of helplessness that has slowly accumulated over the week. My resolve has become unsteady, swaying back and forth like a Jenga tower until it finally collapses in a pathetic heap.

Sabbath has been a Godsend. I don’t have to do my assignments, I don’t have to check on the university intranet and I don’t have to e-mail any teachers. This is the easy part of Sabbath–the not doing. It’s great not having to do any work or chores or homework or whatnot, but it’s not so easy forgetting that work needs to be done on Sunday. Do we ever give God our entire attention during any day, let alone Sabbath? If I was able to forget about my university worries than I wouldn’t be writing this blog post, surely.

The important thing to remember about Sabbath is that it’s supposed to be the culmination of a spirit-filled week. Think of it as the little marzipan couple on top of the wedding cake. The reason why so many people have a hard time getting into the swing of church is because they haven’t spent time with God during the previous six days. If people got up early every morning to have devotion, they wouldn’t have such a hard time making it in for Sabbath school.

I’m probably the worst offender. Two weeks ago I was set a challenge from a friend at church to get up at six a.m./five forty-five every morning for prayer and a Bible reading. I actually prayed the night before that I wouldn’t be tired, but still, on the first morning of my task, I yawned, rolled over and went back to sleep. The following days resulted in an internal battle of ‘should I get up or shouldn’t I?’ and it all became so intense that I’d stop feeling tired anyway. It’s all a process, but I’m fully aware that the less time I spend with God during the week, the less likely I’m going to make it to Sabbath school–what’s more, the less likely I am to completely devote my Sabbath to God–physically and mentally. I’m sitting here typing and all the while my other problems are getting in the way. Should I not trust that God has it all in control?

So, I’m re-setting the challenge. Early bed; early rise, early rise; good devotion. Why not give it a go?

 

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One thought on “Mental Rest

  1. Pingback: So Much Happens in Seven Days… « The Wayward Wanderer

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